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or last 11 seasons writing for ESPNBoston.com, ESPN.com, NHL.c

in Share With Other Members Thu Nov 28, 2019 11:58 pm
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PHILADELPHIA -- Lewis Katz, a self-made man who built his fortune in New York parking lots, billboards and cable TV, and went on to buy the NBAs New Jersey Nets, NHLs New Jersey Devils and The Philadelphia Inquirer, died in a weekend plane crash. Soccer Jerseys For Sale . He was 72. Katz died Saturday night in a Massachusetts crash that claimed six other lives. His death was confirmed Sunday by his son, Drew, and his business partner Harold H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest. Katz grew up in working-class Camden, New Jersey, and worked as a lawyer before earning hundreds of millions of dollars investing in the Kinney Parking empire and the Yankees Entertainment and Sports Network in New York. He went on to become a major philanthropist in the Philadelphia region. "Youve got to make money in the world that we live in, in order to accomplish what your ultimate goal is. But along with making money, equally important is preserving, for the community, a community trust," Katz testified at an April hearing on the Inquirers sale. "Thats what this paper represents." Tributes poured in from prominent figures in sports, media, politics, business and education, reflecting the wide range of his interests and charitable endeavours. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver called him "a visionary"; the Yankees held a moment of silence before Sundays game. Temple University recalled his recent advice to graduates to "have as much fun as you can conjure up." "He was a visionary businessman who touched the lives of so many with his tireless pursuit of innovation and enterprise, as well as his deep commitment to his family, friends and community," Silver said in a statement. NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman in a statement called Katz a man of "tremendous influence" and sent condolences to Katzs family and "the many organizations that benefited from his philanthropy." Katz, in his April testimony, said he had lost money on both the Nets and Devils, but made it big through the 2012 sale of the sports cable network. "We lost our shirt in the Devils and the Nets," he testified. "But for the YES network, Id be back in my law office in Cherry Hill, waiting for the clients to come in again." He hoped to be a hands-off owner of the Inquirer, where his longtime companion, Nancy Phillips, was the city editor. "Im spending, hopefully, a lot more time with my grandchildren and Ive opened a school in Camden for approximately 300 children," he testified. "Im not active in business, anymore." Katz had agreed to invest $16 million for a 26 per cent stake in the Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News in 2012 at the behest of former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, who wanted to return the newspapers to local ownership after a bankruptcy that left them in the hands of New York hedge funds. But a feud with rival investor George Norcross, an equally powerful business leader, over the direction of the news business forced him to be more a more active owner. Katz filed suit last year to stop Norcross from firing Pulitzer Prize-winning editor Bill Marimow. He succeeded, then joined Lenfest in bidding $88 million to buy out Norcross and his allies at an auction Tuesday. "He was very creative, as a person and as a business partner," Lenfest said. "He thought beyond the edge. He had wonderful, creative ideas." The sale had been set to close June 12, but will now be delayed for 30 days to give Katzs family time to get the estate in order, Lenfest said. "Well lose his expertise, but the paper will continue because we both intended to put a new CEO in charge of the day-to-day operations," Lenfest said. Drew Katz will take his fathers seat on the board of directors, Lenfest said. "My father was my best friend. He taught me everything," Drew Katz, who was often seen at his fathers side at business events, said in a statement on behalf of him and his sister. "He never forgot where and how he grew up, and he worked tirelessly to support his community in countless ways that were seen and unseen." Katz had recently given $25 million to Temple University for its medical school, and had previously given $15 million to another alma mater, Dickinson Law School, where he had graduated first in his class. He also supported the Boys & Girls Clubs in Camden, along with many Jewish charities. Katz recently helped fund a charter school in impoverished Camden. "There are so many organizations that he endowed, many anonymously," Marimow said Sunday. Marimow described Katz as a brilliant man and generous philanthropist who developed a love for journalism from a college stint working for the syndicated columnist Drew Pearson. "That really inspired an appreciation and a love for journalism that lasted his whole life," Marimow said. His wife, Marjorie, died in December. His survivors include his son, daughter Melissa, and several grandchildren. Katz, a classmate of Bill Cosby in Temples 1963 graduating class, had spoken at the schools commencement last month, and received an honorary doctorate. "Life in my view is meant to be enjoyed," he told the graduates. "Its meant to have as much fun as you can conjure up" Fake Soccer Jerseys . Summers has seen scant playing time with the Coyotes since being selected 29th overall by the club in the 2006 NHL Entry Draft, having played in 47 career NHL games. Cheap Soccer Jerseys . He was 90. The team announced Monday that Adams had died, saying he "passed away peacefully from natural causes." The son of a prominent oil executive, Adams built his own energy fortune and founded the Houston Oilers. https://www.cheapsoccerjerseysjustwholesale.com/ . General manager David Poile called signing Ribeiro a great opportunity to add a talented, experienced and creative centre Tuesday when he introduced the veteran at a news conference. Ribeiros contract is worth $1.05 million after being bought out of the final three years of a $22 million contract by the Coyotes recently.NHL broadcaster Pierre McGuire admitted he was taken by surprise when at the end of his post game interview with P.K. Subban following the Canadiens Game 7 win over the Bruins in the second round, after the Montreal defenceman planted a huge kiss on McGuires forehead as he exclaimed, "Yeah baby!" before heading off to celebrate with his teammates in their dressing room. "I didnt see that coming at all," McGuire told TSN.ca recently. But what McGuire has always seen coming was the performance and level of play Subban showed in the Canadiens run through to Game 6 of the 2014 Eastern Conference Final. Subban finished the playoffs with 14 points in 17 games, with seven of those points coming in that series win over the Bruins. He played a major role in helping Montreal upset the Presidents Trophy winners and helped lead his team to within two wins of their first Stanley Cup Final berth in 21 years. As McGuire pointed out, it wasnt just Subbans skill - that helped him win the 2013 Norris Trophy - that allowed him to take a big step forward in the playoffs, but also the enthusiasm he showed in that interview and how he applies that both on and off the ice. "I remember when P.K. went to his first World Junior Championship and talking to him before he flew over to Pardubice," McGuire said. "He was beaming and just so excited to go over there and to be part of the experience. Obviously then he was such a raw talent and hes worked hard to get to where he is now. But that excitement and enthusiasm for the game has never faded. Its still there now and thats a main reason for what youre seeing now. Thats why hes a leader. He loves the game; he plays it the right way and youre seeing that more and more now. Can he improve? Yes and hell tell you that. But what youre seeing now is the potential anyone who knew him well saw." While winning the Norris Trophy last season impressed his teammates, that passion for the game and what he did to help the Canadiens go deep into the playoffs was equally if not more impressive. "Hes definitely maturing and hes showing why he won the Norris Trophy," said teammate Carey Price on Saturday. "He had an excellent postseason. For us to win the Cup, were going to need him to play that way. Hes a fun-loving guy; hes fun to hang out with and he makes it enjoyable to come to the rink every day. Hes a really good buddy of mine obviously and I was happy to see him succeed in the playoffs and prove a lot of doubters wrong." Canadiens defenceman Mike Weaver was acquired at the trade deadline and in his short time as Subbans teammate, realized how infectious the 25-year-olds love of the game was having an effect on him.. Wholesale Soccer Jerseys. "I think a lot of the time the enjoyment of the game is sometimes forgotten," said Weaver, who is an unrestricted free agent in July. "You almost gotta get back to the time when you had fun playing hockey and instead of it being a job, its more of a privilege. Playing with him and even in playing in Montreal, I started to enjoy the game again." When told of Weavers comments, a flattered Subban told the media that enjoying the game and embracing the moment has always been an important part of his approach. "I enjoy every moment," Subban said on Saturday. "Through the ups and downs you have to because as much as careers are long, theyre short too. You just dont know what can happen so you have to enjoy your time when youre out there. The playoffs are a fun time to play and I obviously enjoy playing that time of year." Subban, who is a restricted free agent again this July (this time with arbitration rights), will continue to be a hot topic as the offseason gets under way. But before he headed off for what will be his shortest summer yet as an NHLer, he made it clear he wants to continue to enjoy the playoff moments with the Canadiens and help them build towards and achieve their ultimate goal of winning their 25th Stanley Cup. "Theres something about that," Subban explained. "Theres something about building a team and being part of a special group that youve seen grow from the bottom up and add blocks along the way. Theres something special about winning with a team like that. I believe we have an opportunity to do that here. I look at the Montreal Canadiens winning the Cup in 93 and only being to the conference finals two times since then, and Ive been to them both times. A lot of guys go their whole career and never make it to a conference final and get to within two wins of a Stanley Cup Final, so I understand the importance of taking advantage of those moments. Its unfortunate we didnt get that done this year, but I know that the future is bright and theres going to be plenty of opportunities for us to redeem ourselves and take that next step." James Murphy is a freelance reporter who also writes for NHL.com, the Boston Herald and XNsports.com. He covered the Boston Bruins/NHL for last 11 seasons writing for ESPNBoston.com, ESPN.com, NHL.com, NESN.com, the Boston Metro, Insidehockey.com and Le Hockey Magazine. Murphy also currently hosts the radio show "Murphys Hockey Law" heard Saturdays 9-11 AM ET on Sirius/XM NHL Network Radio and 4-6 PM ET on Websportsmedia.com. In addition to that, he is a regular guest TSN 690 in Montreal and Sirius/XM NHL Network Radio as well as a hockey analyst on CTV Montreal. ' ' '

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