#1

The choice will ultimately belon

in Share With Other Members Mon Jan 13, 2020 11:22 pm
by sakura698 • 1.170 Posts

MISSISSAUGA, Ont. Vapormax BHM . -- Sam Bennett isnt accustomed to being last in anything. First among North American skaters in NHL Central Scoutings final 2014 draft rankings, the Kingston Frontenacs centre finished dead-last in one category during Saturdays fitness testing at the annual combine. Bennett couldnt do a single pull-up. "I was definitely disappointed with myself," Bennett said. "I was wanting to do the best I can in every test. But, I guess, ultimately games arent won or lost if you can do a pull-up in the gym." Bennett likely wont take much of a hit from being 12 pull-ups behind the leaders. If anything, his showing could help whichever team takes him early in the first round June 27 in Philadelphia. "The fact that he can play the game the way he plays the game, I think the teams feel that hes a pretty complete package," NHL Central Scouting director Dan Marr said. "This is what the whole combines about: The team thats going to get Sam Bennett knows what work lies ahead and theyll be able to put him on the proper path for development." Bennett finished ahead of Barrie defenceman Aaron Ekblad, Kootenay centre Sam Reinhart and two other potential top picks, Prince Albert winger Leon Draisaitl and Oshawa winger Michael Dal Colle because of what he developed into on the ice. With his fathers favourite player, Doug Gilmour, overseeing his progress as Kingstons general manager, the Holland Landing, Ont., native had 36 goals and 55 assists in 57 OHL games this past season. But just like with pull-ups, Bennett doesnt want to be defined by numbers alone. "I think (what sets me apart) really just a combination of my hockey sense along with my compete level," he said. "I think I compete as hard, if not harder, than anyone else." Bennett isnt the only one trying to compete to go first overall, or in the top five, the first round or in the draft, period. Over a hundred fellow prospects joined him at this weeks combine with the aim of impressing NHL teams. Well before the physical grind that was Saturdays fitness testing, players gathered outside of Toronto to meet with NHL teams. Marr likened the entire process to a giant conveyor belt as these teenagers went through the mental trials of often answering the same questions over and over. Most dont mind it. Top European skater Kasperi Kapanen -- son of former NHL forward Sami -- called it "natural" to sit around and talk to people, and Draisaitl didnt want to downplay the week, either. "I think its really important for them to know what kind of a guy I am and how I work off the ice," said Draisaitl, the only German-born player at the combine. "Thats a really important part of it. Its not only everything about the ice." Teams have spent countless hours watching these players on the ice, and thats not what the combine is about. Despite talk among general managers about adding on-ice testing, there is nothing of the sort, and individual teams arent allowed to invite prospects to their cities to skate. At the annual GM meeting in March, commissioner Gary Bettman said there was some discussion to see "what needs to be done to make the combine as effective as possible." After consultation with strength coaches, Marr said that new, more "dynamic" tests were put in this year to better gauge players physical abilities. One change was pull-ups replacing push-ups because it meant players had to lift their own body weight. While Bennett couldnt do one, Brandon centre Jayce Hawryluk and Czech winger David Pastrnak each did 12. Of course that doesnt necessarily mean theyll be better players, or that theyre closer to being NHL-ready. "This isnt a pass or fail type of test," Marr said. "It just allows the NHL teams to see where these players are in their current state of development." Bennett, who turns 18 in June, conceded that hell need to work on his upper-body strength in the gym this summer. As Marr knows, thats not unusual for junior-aged players. "(At age) 17, 18, 19, if you go back in history with some of the players in the game, theyll find that there was one summer that really made a difference in their physical development," he said. "So maybe at this stage he just hasnt had that summer of development, and itll come." By then, Bennett will more than likely be a top-five pick. If he goes first to the Florida Panthers -- or whoever makes that selection -- itll be clear that on-ice potential is worth tons more than a lack of pull-ups. "It would be pretty special," Bennett said. "At the end of the day it is just a number, and everyones going to be in the same spot come training camp, trying to make the team. Obviously it is every kids dream to go as high as they can get into the NHL." Vapormax Off White Italia . No, the San Antonio star didnt announce retirement plans during an off day at the NBA Finals on Wednesday. Vapormax 97 Scontate . The Laval Rouge et Or defensive back/kick-returner gained the invitation following his showing Sunday at an NFL regional combine in Baltimore. http://www.scarpevapormaxscontate.it/vapormax-chrome-blush-italia.html . -- Derek Jeter spoke for 25 minutes, 44 seconds and answered 26 questions about his decision to retire at the end of this season.WINNIPEG As an early afternoon practice wrapped in the blustery Manitoba capital of Winnipeg, Maple Leafs head coach Randy Carlyle ambled over to James Reimer, stretching just outside the visitors crease, and offered a quick word. He, the 25-year-old Toronto backup net-minder and Manitoba native, would be making just his fourth start in the past 16 games against the Jets the following evening. It was the word of opportunity for Reimer, who has fallen into the role of backup, outmatched in recent weeks by Jonathan Bernier, his Quebec counterpart. "Its been," said Reimer in conversation with the Leaf Report, pausing briefly to choose his words, "its been an interesting year. Thats maybe the best way I can describe it." More than eight months after he steered the Leafs into their first playoff appearance in nine years and Reimer is no longer the no. 1 guy in Toronto. Bernier has wrestled hold of that mantle for the time being, earning the bulk of starts since the middle of December 32 on the year compared with 21 for Reimer. Challenged, doubted, and dissected often throughout his 127-game NHL career, be it through summer trade talk for Roberto Luongo, deadline trade talk for Miikka Kiprusoff or a concussion that badly derailed his first full season, Reimer has managed to overcome a series of different hurdles in his tenure as a Leaf, but maybe nothing quite like this. Bernier is not a rumoured threat, nor a nagging injury to bypass, but a feisty challenger itching to prove himself in the spotlight. And thus far, the 25-year-old has taken full advantage of the opportunity hes been granted in Toronto, sitting amongst the top-10 in league save percentage (.925), while eventually establishing himself as the Leafs undeclared no. 1 starter. The looming challenge for Reimer is to snatch the job right back. And he plans to fight for it. He has not and has no intention of asking for a trade out of Toronto despite circumstances (Bernier trade, a proven track record) that might have led others in his situation to stray down that path. "Your end goal is to be the guy and you want that, but youve got to focus on everyday what I need to do so that that can happen," said Reimer. "Its like I want to win the Cup, but its not like every day I hit the ice Im going to win the Cup. I want to win the Cup, but when I hit the ice its what do I need to do to be the best I can be. And if you focus on that everyday then eventually the Cup will come. "Same with this (situation). Its obviously something you want. Its something you really want. But youve got to focus on a lot smaller goals." Those goals start with making full use of the opportunities he gets, however infrequent, and reshape a race that is likely far from over. One such oopportunity presented itself earlier this week in Denver, Reimer propelling the Leafs to an unlikely 5-2 win over the Avalanche with 35 big saves. Vapormax Flyknit Saldi. And now another opportunity looms against the Jets on Saturday evening, his club looking to avenge a 7-1 loss in Dallas two nights earlier. Reimers only real control in the matter of playing time is performance. And though he started with a bang in October a gaudy .949 save percentage in six games that performance has dipped downward (albeit with little help in some situations) with Bernier proving the more reliable and consistent of the two. "Thats exactly the way you approach it," Reimer said of earning more starts with performance. "You try not to look ahead. You try not to say Id like to get 10 out of 12 (starts) or 10 out of 20, or whatever, three out of seven, whatever it may be. "To me, when I get the nod I want to go out there and play my heart out." This is unfamiliar terrain for the Morweena native, that of the NHL backup. Though he very briefly battled with Ben Scrivens at the outset of last season, Reimer has quickly defined himself as a viable starter in the league, finishing 2013 with eighth best save percentage while steering the Leafs to a near-first round upset of the Bruins in the playoffs. He owns an impressive 63-38-15 career mark with a sturdy .915 save percentage. Falling into the role of second fiddle, thus, has been a challenge, mostly in the mental arena. "Its 105 per cent mental, I think, this game," said Reimer. "Its all about trying to be in the right mindset and trying to stay positive and knowing that when you have the extra time to work on stuff thats what youve got to do. Youve got to work your butt off so that when you get the nod youre as prepared as you can (be)." His longer-term future in Toronto remains murky at best. Reimer is a restricted free agent this summer with Bernier locked up for another year. In theory, the organization could opt to keep both though Reimer holds arbitration rights and would seem to hold a pretty good case for a good raise but more than likely one will be gone by next fall, if not sooner. Both want and have earned the right to start. The choice will ultimately belong to general manager Dave Nonis, who brought Bernier into the fold from Los Angeles in his first big splash as the Maple Leafs boss last summer. Reimer wants to stay and wont ask to go. But he also wants to play and intends to fight to do so. "I feel like Im becoming a better person for it or at least I hope so," he said of the experience this season. "I feel like Im battling and grinding and trying to do everything I can. As far as I know if youre doing that then thats all you can do." ' ' '

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